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no knowledge of wrongdoing, but our shareholders happy? >> the admission from rupert murdoch that he knew little or nothing about what was happening in certain parts of his business empire does not encourage confidence. >> a much anticipated event, but did it deliver? will anything change? >> i am an optimist. i think if they did not change, that we will get a more accountable and responsible press that is not capable of committing criminal acts. >>> rupert murdoch and his son, james, faced a grilling as british politicians attempted to find out if they know anything about alleged phone hacking. both denied any knowledge of wrongdoing and were apologetic about what went on. he described the day as the most humble of his life. investors seemingly approved of what was said. news corp.'s share price rose by the close of sale tuesday. has the storm been weathered? has dominatedng politics here for weeks, but is it just a storm in a british teacup? a global tycoon like rupert murdoch must hope so. >> "the news of the world" is less than 1% of our company. we employ 350,000 people around the wo
by rupert murdoch, has resigned from her position. she had resisted calls, not least from former "news of the world" journalists for her to resign after the revelations that "news of the world" journalists had been responsible, allegedly, for hacking the phones of, amongst others, a murdered school child, milly douler, and also those of the relatives of servicemen who had been killed in afghanistan and iraq. rebekah brooks has resigned as chief executive of news international. aaron is here. a business decision, this one? >> well, look, another shock -- well, in two weeks of shocks we've had coming out of this story. now, this is quite amazing, because yesterday's story was trying to get rebekah brooks and, of course, rupert murdoch's son in front of this hearing committee, where they are expected to be grilled very hard. now, rebekah brooks had said she welcomed to answer the questions, but some of the questions she said she may not be able to answer. now, he's the question, because this is just breaking, we're still basically reading across here and just trying to find out the implic
. they will discuss questions over the phone hacking scandal. rupert murdoch, his son james, rebekah brooks prepare for questions. >> also coming up on the program, the shuttle atlantis departs the international space station for the very last time. also from the comic book to the stage, that man makes a theatrical debut. -- batman makes a theatrical debut/ . ♪ ♪ >> welcome to the houses of parliament, the mother of all parliament. will it be the mother of all battles today between the mp's and the murdochs. it has been tailing weeks of political crisis that has taken the politics and the police. many journalists and camera crews hurt joining here behind me. we are waiting -- are joining here behind me. we are waiting for questioning of the people. we will bring you the live updates here. the house of commons media and committee is made up of a cross parsee of selection from members of parliament. they will begin by questioning the news corp. chief rupert murdoch and his son james. it will ask the former chief executive rebekah brooks to give testimony. they want to find out how much they knew
yesterday of course with rupert murdoch, the chief of news corp being grilled by the committee with a mixed reception. more on that later from us here at westminster. but in the coming hours, david cameron, the british prime minister is to be grilled by m.p.'s. he's had to cut short a trip to africa in order answer questions. and the british affairs committee questioning tops as they produced a pretty damning report. >> david cameron arrived home late last night having cut short his trip to africa. this morning he'll find a damning report from the way britain's biggest police force has dealt with the phone hacking scandal. they are accused of a catalog of failures and a scathing report of some senior offers. >> i can't say more than that. >> that's john yates describing his choice not to reopen the inquiry when he gave evidence to m.p.'s last week. in the report, they agree with him. >> i'm not letting you get away with that. absolutely not. >> and even more critical. his conduct is described as unprofessional and inappropriate. but the report also criticizes news international. accusing th
to say that this is the most humble day of my life. >> rupert murdoch and his son james r. and not see. the british law makers grill them over what they knew about the scandal. a dramatic attack interrupt the hearing. -- is due to die in texas tomorrow. it is now one of his victims fighting to save his life. hoping to make a splash, the london olympics. we follow one british athlete training hard to make the cut. welcome to our viewers on pbs and america. shocked, appalled, ashamed, the words that rupert murdoch used before lawmakers. that was his reaction tuesday phone hacking scandal that has unraveled his empire and sent shock waves through the military -- through the metropolitan police. they apologized for the hurt that was caused but they claimed that they were not responsible. the proceedings were interrupted by protesters with a plateful of foam. >> the moment when two of the world's most powerful media moguls, rupert murdoch and his son,, arrived to be held to account for the way that there company invaded the privacy of individuals. >> do you have anything to say about the ph
by trying to throw a plate of shaving cream at rupert murdoch. following the murdoch's rebecca brook who's resign head of operations last friday and arrest and questions by police on sunday. brooks, a former editor of news of the world denied prior knowledge of the phone alletions but apologized to the victims. >> it was cruel and i have regrets. just the idea that phone access was by someone of the news of the world is abhorrent to me as it is to everyone in this room and it's ultimate regret the speed in which we have found out and tried to find out the bottom of the investigations have been too slow. i think james a rupert both accepted that earlier and we're endeavoring to continue to continue to investigate. but of course there are regrets. don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorized no sanction approval for anyone listening to the voice mails of those circumstances. i don't know anyon who would think it was the right and proper thing to do at this time or at any time. >> charlie: also appearing s sir paul hnson the head of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the heari
phone hacking of murder victims and their families. where does this leave rupert murdoch's news coverage. >> they will lose money, they will lose advertising. you start off with some on sunday. you can make a whole lot of money. >> is the role of government to make us all feel happier about ourselves? we speak to a psychologist who says yes. the news of the world has spent much of its life as the highest selling english-language newspaper but it will now cease to exist. the paper will be published following a string of phone hacking allegations. it hacked into the parents of murdered school children and those killed in iraq. >> rupert murdoch bought "the news of the world," at the tail end of the 60 plus. back then, he was in a corner fighting. >> yesterday, he said that i'm not eating came through. >> the closure of the "news of the world," is a sign of murdoch loss ruthless expediency. film and tv, the u.s., and around the world have long ago taken over as the cash accounts -- cash cows. companies have been falling over themselves to pull advertising from the tabloid. murdoch plus peop
, "bbc world news." >> will he? won't he? rupert murdoch and his son deciding if they will face a parliamentary committee over the british phone hacking scandal. clouds over the italian economy as the senate bets on a 40 billion euro cut package and the markets give their verdict. hours after the death of the afghan president's half brother, four people are killed as they attend his memorial service. welcome to bbc world news. also coming up on the program. in mumbai, the death toll rises to 18. just who did carry out india's worst militant attack since 2008? big dreams from a tiny island. one of the world's smallest countries hoping for olympic success. hello. it could be another landmark moment in the phone-hacking scandal. we should know very seen whether the media tycoon rupert murdoch has agreed to be questioned by members of british parliament. his son, james, and rebecca brooks have also been invited to appear before the hearing. we can go live to westminster. it feels like we're on the deadline hour for learning whether rupert murdoch is going to say yea or nay to appear
." >> this is bbc world news america. i am rajesh. rupert murdoch will appear on the phone hacking scnadal as the -- scandal as the fbi starts it s investigation. a crackdown in syria continues, and we cross the border to see how thousands are living. pages.e of jane austen's this is not i nthn the hands of the highest bidder. >> we say welcome to our viewers in america and around the globe. next tuesday, rupert murdoch and his son, james ,will appear before british lawmakers about the phone hacking scandal. the fbi has opened an investigation into the hacking into the phones of 9/11 victims. we have this report from the deputy politcal editor. >> parlaiment wants to hold rebecca brooks and james and rupert murdoch to account, to answer questions about why so many people's phones were hacked in the name of news. it was a summons they could not ignore. >> it just is insane. you can't hide away. you can't hide away from this level of anguish and anger. >> the murdochs were reluctant. rupert murdoch said he could not attend, but said he would give evidence. his son, james, said he couldn't ma
would this have on the global empire of rupert murdoch? we are joined from new york by the media editor for the "financial times." thank you for joining us. news corp. shares are down. is the scandal in danger of in danger in the entire empire? >> i think you have to separate the two things. is there any allegation that similar behavior was taking place in any of the u.s. operations? there are no allegations. this is a fast-moving investigation. we don't know what it will throw up next. clearly, there has been contamination to the way that investors in the u.s. and around the world, they see the risks attached to part of the business they never paid much attention to, the u.k. newspapers. they are slow-growing and shrinking assets that were not a big part of the investor focus until last week. >> one group has accused rupert murdoch of treating the company like a family candy jar. do you think there could be growing unease among investors? >> for context, these are relatively small institutional investors. they have added this to their libby of complaints. we are picking up concern abou
information for stories including phone hacking. >> united against rupert murdoch. the conservatives and demonstrates have made a highly unusual decision to support this calling on him to withdraw his bid. >> it's in the public interest that rupert murdoch sees there's complete outrage about the behavior of his employees and organization and a real concern about that organization controlling yet more of our media in this country. in the public interest he should back down. if he doesn't, i hope we'll be developing legislation to make that happen. >> also david cameron will be setting up inquiries at news of the world and other papers. a judge will oversee which are in effect two inquiries. one into hacking and another into the relations between politicians and the press. past and present politicians could be compelled to give testimony under oath. rupert murdoch and others were courted by politicians and now they are called upon to answer questions about wrong doing. >> a key u.s. senator has called for an investigation as to whether hacking had extended to american citizens and 9/11
, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. rupert murdoch's news corp. has dropped their bid for bskyb. >> they clearly need to do with the problems that news international. >> 21 people were killed in a financial capital. the fighting continues to rage in libya. colonel gaddafi's forces and the rebels are still in a tug of war. the last few days have brought an incredible reversal of fortune for rupert murdoch's media empire and today can get another blow. bowling to public and political pressure, news corp. withdrew their bid for bskyb. this is in the wake of the hacking scandal. for more on how the deal went, here is the bbc's business editor. >> rupert murdoch, the great news mobile is in the news for what he would see as the wrong reasons. the great humiliations' of his career, the abandonment of his desire to get all of british news broadcasting. "we believe that the acquisition would benefit both companies it has become clear that it is too difficult to progress in this climate." this was the appalling climate for mr. murdoch. >> when such a
for europe and th united states and the rupert--upert murdoch case. >>> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding provided by these funders: and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studiosn new york city, this is charlie rose. >> psident obama had a press conferen earlier th morning following five days of closed door meetings with top congressional leaders. at the news conference his third in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payme on deficit reduct
error of judgment he made in hiring andy coleson. rupert murdoch, his son james and news international chief executive rebekah brooks have been summoned to appear before a parliamentary committee next tuesday. questions have begun to arise about the impact this scandal will have on the future of murdoch's global media empire and what it pact it will have on british politics and the future of prime minister david cameron. his press spokesman andrew coleson, former editor of "news of the world" has resigned and has been arrested. joining me from london, alan rusbridger, the editor of "the guardian," catherine mayor, "time" magazine london bureau chief. the cover story on "time" is hers and alister campbell, former communications director to prime minister tony blair. joining me frocambridge, john burns, the "new york times" london bureau chief. here with me in new york is roger cohen of "new york times" and josh tie ren tie ren jell of blooplberg business week. where is the story as we speak? >> everyday brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupe
. for all their troubles, rupert murdoch got a boost when a saudi prince who controls much of the company voiced his support. what about the rest of the board? it is addressed in an article in "the daily beast" today. news corporation shares are up. the news hacking scandal is off the front pages for the first time in two weeks. but independent directors have hired their own top lawyers. why? >> we are getting mixed signals. we have heard the board have hired some lawyers to protect shareholder value and to guard against their own legal exposure. there have also been reports that some of the more independent minded directors are beginning to think about ways in which rupert murdoch could give up his title as ceo of the company. on the other hand, this is a board murdoch controls pretty firmly. it is hard to say what will happen yet. >> who exactly is on the board? >> it is a funny bunch. there are 16 board members. they cover a lot of ground. there is a former head of state and there is an opera singer. there is quite a range of experience. the one thing they all have in common is they ar
from the pages of rupert murdoch's newspaper to the walls of parliament. >> the shuttle has cleared the tower. -- the tunnel. >> it is countdown for the space shuttle final launch. we hear from one at nasa veteran who was there from the start. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. aid agencies have issued an urgent appeal for help for millions affected by drought in east africa. the crisis has been particularly cruel to somalia, kenya, uganda, and ethiopia. more than 300,000 people have walked days to get to the refugee camp in kenya. ben brown has been there for a week. >> among the refugees at this camp, there are hundreds of lost children and orphans. some got separated from their families on the long walk from somalia. others, like abdi and his sister, no longer have parents. their father died in somalia's civil war. last month, their mother was killed as well. >> it is better here. back in somalia, there was war. we have no relatives there, so we fled here. we now have a foster mother to look after us. >> in the camp hospital, these children have parent
. at they don't want to hear that. there is a serious grumbling taking place. rupert murdoch's "news of the world" at tabloid is dead. >> they would go and do anything. >> even breaking the law? >> absolutely. >> that is a former editor and reporter of "news of the world," now defunct because rupert murdoch's company has killed it because they were packing into voice-mail -- hacking into voice-mails over the years, the families of victims of terrorism. even by british tabloids -- >> when you say that, you are moving the corporate rupert murdoch and the ascent was made by "news of the world, made a lot of money by it appealing to siliceous instance and naked girls and murders. he became a huge world actor. now it is coming to haunt him. he is an extraordinary operator, so he will get away from this, but closing the newspaper? >> also, through the media conglomerate, owns the fox tv, "the wall street journal" -- >> which is why this is on page one of "the new york times." >> and "the washington post." murdoch is just about to buy complete control of the big network, television network,
and rupert murdoch left a restaurant last night. by allowing media access like this, news corporation is keen to convey a message that it's all business as usual. rebekah brooks stopped to help a photographer who fell over in the melee. it's understood she could soon be interviewed by police as a witness, though she says she knew nothing about phone hacking when she was editor of "news of the world." other news international exec tizz are said to be cooperating fully with the police inquiry. earlier, rupert murdoch gave a very public show of settlement to rebekah brooks. she's said to have offered her resignation twice, only to be turned down. asked what her priority was now, he said this one, referring to her. the murdoches, father and son, refused to answer any detailed questions when they faced the media. it's been a bruising few days for the murdoch empire, but even tougher days lie ahead. more revelations and more arrests are expected. the house of commons could vote to delay the bskyb takeover until the criminal investigation into hacking has been completed. that multibillion pound deal
, including an attack on media mogul rupert murdoch by a prankster armed with a plate of shaving cream. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we examine today's proceedings where the head of news corp said he was shocked, appalled and ashamed, but not responsible for the misdeeds. we talk to john burns of "the new york times" and david folkenflik of npr. >> brown: then, we ask nuclear regulatory commission chair gregory jaczko if u.s. reactors could withstand an earthquake like the one that devastated japan. >> ifill: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on the challenges and the troubles facing one of the world's largest democracies. >> it made tremendous strides politically and economically but still struggles with corruption. >> brown: kwame holman updates the budget battles as the house and senate offer dueling plans for reducing the deficit. >> ifill: and judy woodruff explores the deadline-driven deal cutting underway with political editor david chalian. >> brown: plus, in a season of tornadoes, floods and more, we get some poetic perspec
to rupert murdoch's giant media empire. it's "nightly business report" for wednesday, july 13. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. late today, the aaa credit rating of the united states was officially put on notice. moody's investor service placed the government's bond rating on review for possible downgrade. without a debt deal on capitol hill, moody's points to a "small but rising risk of a short-lived default" tom, that warning comes as the federal reserve says its ready to add more fuel to the economy if the recovery runs out of gas. >> tom: susie, fed chairman ben bernanke made that pledge during his semiannual congressional testimony today. that helped investor confidence, at least initially. stocks rallied sharply during the chairman's testimony but backed off those highs as the day wore on. by the close, the dow was up just 44 points, the nas
. the action comes a day before c.e.o. rupert murdoch and his son, james, testify before the british parliament tomorrow morning, but our guest tonight says newscorp stock is still his top pick. joining us now? jason bazinet, media analyst at citigroup. hi, jason, nice to you have with us. >> thank you so much. >> susie: let's start right off with that stock. it's been down sharply since the scandal broke. and you said in a citi report that news corporate is quote too compelling to ignore. tell us why you are so bullish on the stock? >> well, there are a couple of reasons the stock is down some of. one is several weeks ago people expected news corporate to consolidate all of bskyb and now that is not happening. it disappoint investors. and second you have this broadening scandal. but when we look at the numbers news corp. is trade being 10 times forward earnings. and parently they have about 12 billion of cash on the balance. if you make that adjustment and remove the cash from the market capitalization they are trading closer to 6.5 times earnings. that's too compelling to ignore. >> what abou
, judy. >> brown: the "news of the world" scandal in britain took new turns today. the rupert murdoch tabloid is shutting down on sunday amid allegations that reporters hacked into phones of murder victims and the families of slain soldiers. today, police in london arrested three people, including former editor andrew coulson, who once worked for prime minister david cameron. and cameron himself faced new questions. awe instead of standing in his traditional place at the back of the home watching david cameron speak, he was heading for a south london station where he was arrested and questioned on suspicion of conspiracy to hack phones and on suspicion of bribing police officers. >> i made that decision to employ andy. he had resigned from the news of the world. he said at the time he didn't know what was happening on his watch. he should have known what was happening on his watch. he paid the price. he resigned. >> david cameron hired him to run his press operation barely five months after he resigned as editor of the news of the world and the paper's royal correspondent was jailed f
operates. rupert murdoch currently controls 40% of british newspaper sales. does closing "news of the world," make much difference? >> i suspect that one of his other tabloids will have a sunday edition. i think the extraordinary thing is that we were ever prepared to allow this man to have this kind of control over british life. he has never really bought into this society. he is and i australian who became an american to preserve his media ownership. in america, you have to be an american to own substantial media interests. this is a cancer is pollution of corruption that has been led by this newspaper which appears to have no shame whatsoever and hacking into the mobile phone and messages from the mobile phone of a 13-year-old murder victim. >> this is a man who has been able to quite literally make and break prime ministers of great britain. >> i know exactly how it seems. it came about because mrs. thatcher, i think that she did great things for this country as everyone in america appreciates. i tell you, she fell upon the neck of murdoch because here was a man who believed the same th
run in elizabeth warren of's future? phone hackingh scandal -- media mogul rupert murdoch called before a committee of british parliament. >> do you have a responsibility? >> no. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> here is the deal -- as we require this program, we don't know how the debt ceiling business is going to play out over the weekend, but we have to put a program on the air, so here goes. president obama said he hopes to elevate the tone of her political discourse in washington. >> the way we run campaigns, the demonization of what the other side, i think that is broken down some of the trust and washington. >> anyone who witnessed his reckless spending ahabits the past 2.5 years or sat across the negotiating table the past few weeks could be forgiven for being skeptical of his recent attempts to come across as a fiscal moderate. >> that is senate minority leader mitch mcconnell, who has made no secret of his hope that president obama is a one-term president, but as mark said last week, at least he is honest about it. some democrats are a
to the media-watched program. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> rupert murdoch, an australian, and how much coverage is it getting over there? >> in his newspapers, almost nothing. on page 18 there's a tabloid paper that is owned by news limited. the rival fairfax papers have given it a bit more, but i would hardly say it's beaning. >> has there in your knowledge ever been an episode hike this in any kind of media? this phone hacking that really seems to be going global every day. >> knowing mr. murdoch and his empire as we do, it's even more fascinating. it may even play into more sha nan gans going on here. but to answer your question, i don't think we have had or are likely to have more like this. because our media environment is less competitive than britain's. we don't have a slew of newspapers competing with each other. we have individual cities with individual newspapers. most of them only one newspaper and most of the cities are owned by rupert murdoch. >> and i know there's real competition rather in the tabloid press and between television news programs. >> yes. our job so lo
public knowledge. rupert murdoch's chief executive in the u.k. is looking into this and robert murdoch is looking into taking full control of the company, a move that requires government approval. de ed miliband says it was beyond belief that anyone would undertake such a cruel and immoral act. but some in politics say political leaders have been too easily cowed by murdoch's enterprises. >> politicians are frightened of news international and they need to act. but there are calls for full inquiry once the criminal investigation has been completed into what happened in the milly dowler case and many others. bbc news reporting. >> we can speak to our political correspondent in our london studio. this brings together two of the most explosive stories you can imagine. give us a little more background into the milly dowler case, which has captured the attention of the nation. >> yes. milly dowler was a 13-year-old schoolgirl who went missing in 2002, sparking a nationwide search. six months later she was found dead. the case has recently been back in the headlines because last month and wa
of the world," britain's top-selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch's global media empire, has been afflicted by claims of phone hacking. david cameron expressed his shock that the phone of a girl who was murdered years ago was hacked into by a "news of the world" correspondent. >> the scandal has been growing and growing as more and more people learned that their phones had been hacked. now, a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. 13-year-old 2 went missing -- 13-year-old milly dowler went missing. there were allegations that "news of the world" packed into her phone and that some messages might have been deleted in that act. >> if these allegations are true, this is a dreadful act, a dreadful situation. what i have read in the papers is quite shocking -- that someone could do this -- while knowing that the police were trying to find this person and find out what had happened. >> there is more pressure on the prime minister's friend, rebekah brooks, chief executive of news international in the u.k., editor at "news of the world" when milly dowler went missing. she h
rupert murdoch's newscorp has spread to the u.s. the f.b.i. has opened an investigation into whether murdoch newspapers targeted the phones of 9/11 victims. it comes as rupert murdoch and his son, james, have agreed to testify before a british parliamentary panel. next week, the group will look into phone hacking and bribery by employees of newscorp's british newspaper empire. today, rupert murdoch says his company will recover from any fallout. >> susie: small businesses are often called the engine of the nation's economy. that's why tonight's commentator believes it's key to teach the nation's kids to think like entrepreneurs. with tonight's "kids and cash," here's jack harris, president of junior achievement of georgia. >> for generations, we've been taught to believe in the american dream-- owning a house, buying a car, living the good life. but this generation of kids could be the first that might not do better financially than their parents. that's why it's so important to teach business to children at a young age. at junior achievement, we work with millions of american studen
and about rupert murdoch's aborted bid for b-sky-b-- british sky broadcasting. we start with a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: rupert murdoch flew the prime minister postponed parliament's summer break by a day to try to re-establish his own standing with a statement and debate. after two weeks of resisting pressure for a full-scale apology for hiring andy coulson david cameron edged towards one and he said people would hear the full genuine article if andy coulson was found to have lied. >> i have an old fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. but if it turns out i've been lied to that would be a moment for a profound apology. and in that event i can tell you i will not fall short. people will of course make judgements about it. of course i regret and i am extremely sorry about the furore it has caused with 20/20 hindsight and all that has followed i would not have offered him the job and i expect that he would not have taken it. but you don't make decisions in hindsight. you make them in the present. you live and you learn, and believe yo
guarding a meeting of local leaders. the rupert murdoch media empire news corporation dropped its bid today to take over british sky broadcasting. it was the latest fallout from the firestorm of allegations that murdoch tabloids hacked into phones of celebrities, royals and even murder victims. we have a report from gary gibbon of independent television news. >> reporter: for decades, he's loomed over british politics. feted by politicians, rarely denied his wishes. but today, parliament rose up as one, all three main parties united, telling rupert murdoch he could not expand his media ownership here, right now. and he buckled. in a statement on their takeover plans, news corp said that it was too difficult to progress in this climate, but that news corp reserves the right to make an offer at a later date. >> i think this is the right decision, i've been saying that this company clearly needs to sort out the problems there are at news international, at the "news of the world." that must be the priority, not takeovers, so the right >> reporter: it's a huge blow for james murdoch, third in co
. in many meetings with the international bosses. and rupert murdoch, who left after the most humble day of his life. >> i told them the same thing. >> i never had one i nappropriate conversation. i completely took myself out of any decision-making about this bid. i had no role in it. no role in when the announcement was made. >> david cameron accused them of hiding their relationships with murdoch. >> i have set up all of the contacts in contrast to the party opposite. i have never held a slumber party. >> he has an old fashioned view that a man is innocent until proven guilty. >> nick robinson, reporting there. the impact this continues to have. i am joined by nick watts from "the guardian." thank you for joining us. >> he did enough to satisfy the conservative party. he was meant to be in africa. he will finish -- and cut his trip short to go to the house of commons. there was a meeting this evening. they banged their desks for a long time. he faces a difficult challenge facing the labor party. two areas highlighted -- point number one, why did he bring him into downing street when th
on the eve of rupert and james murdoch's highly anticipated appearance before british lawmakers tomorrow. for more about the fallout this is having on the media empire itself, i'm joined by "vanity fair" contributing editorer -- editor sarah, who offered "war at the wall street journal," an account of that newspaper's takeover. thank you for ginning us. -- joining us. how damaging are the latest resignations for the police and british government and given the tangled relationships in all of this, is anybody going to escape from the scandal unscathed? >> i think what you see now is that people really don't think anyone is safe at this point. not ruperred, not james, rebecca brooks arrested, hinson resigned. this is no longer a u.k. problem or u.s. problem. it's a global problem for news corporation and people are beginning to question whether rupert murdoch can stay on his job. >> all eyes are on the hearings tomorrow when rupert murdoch and his son james are due to give evidence. what can we expect and what's at stake for their business. >> i was just speaking to someone coaching them fo
of the power passing away in some respect. i don't know when, i don't know how quickly, but rupert murdoch did ok like a spent force. james, i've heard quite divided responses on how h performed. if i re a shareholder, i wouldn't be too happy about him. i thought that -- that he was -- he seemed evasive and repetitive, which to be fair to him i think when he weing asked also repetiti questions, in that surroundingt wasn't very surprising, but he wasn't -- he dn't -- he didn't rely, i think, equate himlf thnough honor to assure the succession. so i'm rather thinking that this is the beginning of the end of an era. >> the judgment is still out on that. i think that it took about an hour for rupert murdoch, who really is a -- as we know a formidable figure -- to at least wake up or at least become engaged. i think heook some time to adjust to the fact that there he was, being pummeled, having questions asked of him. that's not the role he's accustomed of. he's normally chairman, in charge, asking the questions. so that was a little bit of a psychological shock. he did look detached, rd of hearing
as newscorp c.e.o. rupert murdoch and his son james testified before parliament. a comedian stormed toward the senior murdoch, trying to hit him with a shaving cream pie. he wasn't hurt. both murdochs offered a string of apologies for the telephone hacking scandal that has engulfed their company, causing them to shut down their british tabloid "news of the world." >> this is the most humble day of my life. >> it's a mattered of great regret. mine, my father's and everyone at the news corporation. these do not live up to the standards that our company aspires to everywhere around the world. >> susie: despite the apologies, rupert murdoch said he would not step down as c.e.o., saying "i'm the best person to clean this up." shares of newscorp moved higher during the testimony. they finished the day up 5%, closing at 15.79. >> tom: very activelyl traded, really a broad rally today. let's take a look at tonight's market focus. stocks saw strong buying throughout the day thanks to earnings, thanks to positive housing numbers and hope for movement toward a deal on the debt limit. let's roll out d
"news of the world". the rupert murdoch media conglomerate has closed the paper. and it delayed efforts today to take over another company, british sky broadcasting or, b- sky-b. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: gordon brown wooed the murdoch empire like the best of them. but they turned on him, backing david cameron in the last election. today, he turned on them. gordon brown believes his phone and that of his wife may have been hacked into by the "news of the world." he believes someone working on behalf of the "sunday times" accessed his bank account and he believes his son's medical records were obtained by the "sun" newspaper. >> that they had information that fraser had cystic fibrosis which was a matter that they the family were just getting their heads around at the time and dealing with. >> reporter: it was a fast moving day of swirling allegations, political and corporate positioning. amongst the allegations, it was suggested that royal protection officers in the police force had sold confidential royal numbers to the news of the
for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had to find it. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."çç major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >>
rupert murdoch's empire, and the resignation of britain's metropolitan police commissioner just last night. naomi grimley is on the line for us now. naomi, very interesting, because david cameron basically tried to say that the situation that he was faced with, employing andy coulson, formerly editor of "news of the world" was total the different that the police chief who's now resigned who employed andy coulson's former deputy at the same newspaper. >> yes, it's getting rather complicated, this story. but basically, the reason why david cameron was having to do that, to make the distinction between the two situations was because when the metropolitan police commissioner issued his resignation statement last night, he actually threw a parting shot at david cameron and said this, he said, unlike mr. coulson, that was david cameron's former director of communications, mr. wallis had not resigned from the "news of the world" or, to the best of my knowledge, been in any way associated with the original phone hacking investigation. so, in other words, what britain's top policeman was sayi
with experience with cystic fibrosis, and they said the article had been written sensitively. rupert murdoch, still in london, wanted reforms. he, gordon brown, did not. >> when the record as my prime minister -- when my record as prime minister is in, it will show that i refused to support commercial ambitions when i thought they were against the public interest. >> they are facing allegations against the news of the world -- "news of the world." the attack has been pressed home by labour's current leader. the family of milly dowler, whose phone was supposedly hacked. >> i think what the public wants us to do, as the house of commons, is to say that it is not conceivable that robert murdoch could expand his reach in the british media while the issues that happened at news international, the issues of criminality are still being investigated, while there is still news coming out day-by- day. >> this afternoon, the government has said they would back mr. miller band -- milliband. >> in other news, thousands of protestants in northern ireland have been taking part in traditional marches and it
gordon brown said that alleged links between rupert murdoch's news company and the criminal underworld need to be investigated. mr. brown whose son was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, spoke about his shock that they were targeted. she spoke exclusively to glen campbell about allegations she was targeted. >> i have never talked publicly about fraser's condition. obviously, we wanted that to be kept private for all of the obvious reasons. you want to do the best buy your children. and i've never complained about what happened to me before. the truth is that information did come out. i was approached by some newspaper. they told me they had this story about fraser's medical condition and they were going to run this story. >> how did that affect you as a father? >> in tears. your son is now going to be broadcast across the media. sarah and i are upset about it. we are thinking about his future and our family. but there is nothing you can do about it. you are and public life. you don't know how it's appeared. i've not read any claims, but it did appear in "the sun" newspaper. >> it was rebe
-torn country. >> ifill: ray suarez explores what's next for rupert murdoch's media empire, as the investigation expands into the phone hacking scandal. >> woodruff: we update budget negotiations in washington and examine the consequences if lawmakers fail to raise the debt ceiling by the august 2 deadline. >> ifill: tom bearden tells the story of citizen scientists-- some quite young-- on the hunt for ladybugs. >> oh, they're beauties. we can't keep them, sweetie. we're just going to take their picture. >> woodruff: and we reflect on the life of betty ford, as friends, family, and dignitaries gather to pay tribute to the former first lady, who died friday. >> i'm sure they will remember me in recovery and perhaps with equal rights amendment. if i hadn't been married to my husband, i never would have had the voice that i did. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about altern
scandal surrounding rupert murdoch's newscorp continues to grow. his next deal could be in jeopardy. the british government is taking a tougher stance on newscorp's proposed takeover of satellite television company british sky broadcasting. the deal has come under a full- scale inquiry by britain's competition commission. separately, newscorp today withdrew its offer to spin off sky news if the b. sky b. deal is approved. >> susie: while washington is focused on the debt debate, tonight's commentator wants to have a bigger conversation about growth. he's glenn hubbard, dean of the graduate school of business at columbia and former top economic advisor to president george w. bush. >> our current national debate over fiscal austerity masks a conversation we need to have about growth-- to raise incomes and create jobs. faster growth doesn't just happen. a supportive policy environment is needed. we need to encourage participation in the workforce and to provide education and training that match the skills required for today and tomorrow. the productivity of our workforce also depends o
engulfing rupert murdoch's newscorp. now many advertisers, including ford and virgin, are bailing on the "news of the world" tabloid. the paper is under fire for intruding into private voicemails of sports and film stars, politicians and even a murder victim. murdoch said today he will keep the paper's c.e.o. rebekkah brooks in her job, despite calls for her resignation. >> tom: it took almost two decades, but the u.s. and mexico have finally signed a deal to let each other's trucks have unlimited access to each other's highways. this provision was originally part of the nafta agreement, signed back in 1994, but both countries argued for years over safety and financial issues. and there's still opposition. the teamsters union says the deal is probably illegal and opens the border to dangerous trucks. >> susie: in the "money file," making your good credit score work harder for you. here's donna rosato, senior writer at "money magazine." >> got a good credit score? you do if you've got a score of 740 or higher. just one third of americans are members of that elite club. if you're on
to streetcritique@nbr.com. new pressure today for newscorp chairman rupert murdoch to abandon his bid for satellite broadcaster b. sky b. the u.k. government says it will support a non-binding motion in parliament urging newscorp to drop the deal. murdoch has also been asked to answer questions about the phone-hacking scandal surrounding his tabloid, "the news of the world." u.s. regulators say they're not investigating newscorp, but that if issues arise with any of murdoch's u.s. media properties, they will. >> tom: the much-anticipated consumer finance protection bureau will open its doors later this month. the woman setting up the agency, elizabeth warren, said the agency will begin overseeing the nation's biggest banks on july 21. specifically, it will look at how banks with more than $10 billion in assets comply with consumer finance laws. the bureau was set up as part of the dodd/frank financial overhaul passed by congress last summer. >> susie: when it comes to finding common ground in washington, tonight's commentator asks, what does it really mean to be somewhere in the middle? here's tim
-- will be its last. in sun valley, idaho today, media mogul rupert murdoch-- owner of parent company news corporation-- had no comment on the tabloid's closure. but his son james murdoch said in a statement to staffers: fundamentally, action taken a number of years ago by certain individuals, in what had been a good newsroom have breached the trust that the news of the world has with its readers. >> warner: those mistakes first came to light in 2005 when "news of the world" was accused of hacking into cell phone messages of members of the royal family and famous actors. other revelations followed, amid an ongoing but fitful police inquiry. this week, public outrage exploded with leaks from that inquiry, that the family of a murdered teenager milly dowler had been victimized. a private detective working for "news of the world" allegedly hacked her voice mail after she disappeared in 2002, and deleted some messages. the activity on her phone account gave them false hope she was still alive. then yesterday, relatives of victims of london's so-called 7/7 terror attacks in 2005 said they'd bee
. the dow fell 58, the nasdaq lost and the s&p was off five. new pressure on rupert murdoch's newscorp. the u.k. government says it want newscorp to drop its bid for sat broadcaster b. sky b. tomorrow, hilary kramer is our " critique" guest. email your questions to streetcritique@nbr.com. for more financial news, tune in "nightly business report" weekni on this public television statio
to the u.s. today. it was widely reported that the f.b.i. is investigating whether a rupert murdoch tabloid in london tried to access voicemails of 9/11 victims. and murdoch defended his handling of the scandal, speaking to "the wall street journal," which he also owns. he said he's just getting annoyed at all the criticism of his company. a federal judge in washington has declared a mistrial just two days into the perjury trial of baseball great roger clemens. the judge acted after prosecutors showed the jury some evidence that had already been disallowed. clemens is accused of lying to congress when he said he never used steroids. he had nothing to say as he left the courthouse. the judge set a september hearing to decide on holding a new trial. a suicide bomber in afghanistan killed five people today at a memorial service for ahmed wali karzai-- half-brother of the afghan president. the bomber blew himself up at a kandahar mosque where the service was under way. president karzai was not attending. the attack came as a u.n. report said afghan civilian deaths are up 15 percent from a year
to the british parliament. tom simons has the latest. >> when rupert and james murdoch face angry m.p.'s, something mr. murdoch jr. said has resulted in accusations he misled parliament. this is gordon taylor, head of the professional footballers association. in 2008, james murdoch agreed to pay him 700,000 pounds compensation after his phone was hacked by "news of the world" journalists. mr. taylor's lawyers had obtained this email. the blacked-out section is a transcript of messages taken by a private investigator. but on it are the words, transcript for neville. it's alleged the person who received the email from the phone hacker was the "news of the world" chief reporter, neville. it's claimed this email is proof more senior journalists were involved than first thought, including him. this week, the labor m.p., tom watson, asked mr. murdoch -- >> when you signed off the taylor payments, did you see or were you made aware of the transcript of the act? >> no, i was not aware of that at the time. >> but the person who edited the last edition and the paper's lawyer now say james mur
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